6th Venice Brazilian Carnaval Bloco Parade 2020

There’s nothing better to do in sunny California than visiting a beach on a Saturday afternoon. The bloco (community street carnaval band) gathered under the trees on the sandy beach and began the soundcheck with samba music. As they practiced, people gravitated towards the music; some came representing Brazil with their colors and flags, others wore costumes, colorful wigs, and feathered crowns.

People began to parade behind the bloco, ready to dance and chant to the music. Children, adults, men, women proudly representing Brazil animated onlookers to join and dance as well. Others curiously followed and watched. Many began to show their skilled samba moves.

Every now and then you can hear the Abadá Capoeira instructor shouting “Roda! Roda!” encouraging the young children to stand in a circle and perform for the people. The sounds of the berimbau and atabaque resonated through the roda and lead the rhythm that guided the young capoeiristas in their martial art. At times the highly trained capoeira instructors would pick up the pace and play one another, keeping crowds on their toes as they swung their feet right over the others head, dodging them by mere inches!

The weather was perfect and proved to be a great day to parade. As we marched down the boardwalk the bloco kept their energy up for the crowd and the capoeira school proved to be entertaining. It was a time to dress up, be extravagant, and dance to the sound of Brazil. Although it seemed to end as quickly as it began, it was a great family-friendly event within the community. We hope it only gets bigger and better from here and we hope that even more people will join us next year to celebrate such a unique tradition!

Special thanks to Fabio Santana with Kizambo Brass Band.

Ali Lexa and Samba da Mudança.

Abadá Capoeira

Kristal Bivona – UCLA.

UCLA students who helped promote it.

The community at large for participating!

KPFK the media sponsor.

Made possible by Brazil Arts Connection

History Of Brazilian Carnaval

By Samantha Tello

The famous Brazilian Carnival (in Portuguese: Carnaval) is a religious, specifically Catholic event by origin, but is also rooted in European pagan traditions. Originally, Carnival was a food festival, because it was the last time to eat abundantly before the 40 days of Lent, a period of frugality starting on Ash Wednesday. Legend says the word ‘Carnaval’ was derived from the Latin expression ‘carne vale’ which translates as ‘farewell to the meat’. It makes sense now, no?

The unique characteristics of Brazilian Carnaval are rooted in a cultural clash between the Portuguese and the Africans. The whites brought the festival from Europe (Entrudo, an alternative name for Carnaval in Portuguese) and the blacks had their rhythms, music and dance moves. This sounds like the perfect combination! Don’t you think?

Gradually, as the years went by, the tradition was created to go once a year onto the streets to have a party together that lasts 5 days, ending on Ash Wednesday. Musical styles and other customs merged over time. It is a big deal to many people to celebrate this day, it is a piece of their heritage, connecting them to their ancestors who really knew how to party.

In 1916 this culminated with the publishing rights and phono recording of “Pelo Telefone”  by Donga and Mauro de Almeida in Rio de Janeiro. Samba we can say is very much a product of the mutual love for the music of the former colonists and the former slaves. Today, this is music and dance that can be seen as a symbol of the Brazilian culture. In Rio de Janeiro, the first samba schools were established in the early 1920s; the first samba parade competitions were held in 1933.

Fundamentally, the origin of Brazilian Carnaval is very much the concept of ‘pretending’: social conventions are turned upside down. Only these few days of the year it is ‘allowed’ to release a form of catharsis. The idea of presenting themselves as something they are not began as a pagan holiday in ancient Greece and Rome, during which masters and slaves would swap clothes, the rich would wait on the poor, and basically everyone would get drunk and toss all social rules out the window. The poor can wear expensive costumes, the rich can mingle in the streets with the common folk and dress down, men can wear women’s clothing, women can wear barely any clothing. Like we said earlier, it was a safety valve to release all the social pressures that build up in a society where some are more powerful than others. During Carnaval in Brazil, your options are limitless! What would you want to be?

Carnaval is a legitimate opportunity to let yourself completely go in order to forget all your day to day troubles. Basically, Carnaval is a temporary escape into a fantasy world that makes your dreams reality… Are you ready to experience it and have fun?


Renato Carneiro: Katuka Africanidades

By Yennifer Padilla

Brazil!

You think of the music, beautiful beaches, soccer, carnival, capoeira, the amazing food! Almost all aspects of what makes Brazil Brazil has been because of the undeniable contributions by the Afro-Brasileiros. Today, image is everything, especially in the fashion and beauty world. When it comes to Brazil and beauty you instantly think of models Adrianna Lima and Gisele Bunchen. These are the figures that have represented this country but the fashion and beauty world have made drastic changes over the years and is becoming inclusive of all shades, sizes, genders, and ages. This is not only true for models who are at the forefront but also behind the scenes with beauty gurus and fashion designers. In Brazil, more than 50% of the population identifies as black or brown and the afro-brazilian fashion industry is thriving despite the imitation and appropriation. 

So what exactly is Afro-Brazilian fashion? Although it is open to interpretation there are common roots in the use of styles, prints and fabrics from African countries mixed with distinct  Brazilian aspects. One distinct Afro-Brazilian designer named Renato Carneiro is the inventor and founder of Katuka Africanidades. Renato and his family are originally from São Paulo, Brazil and are considered Paulistanos. When Renato visited Salvador, he was inspired and felt a connection to the city. Eventually, he would move to Salvador and pursue his calling as a fashion designer, founding Katuka Africanidades. His shop is a 3-story building on a street corner with a beautiful view of the ocean. 

“I make my clothes for the Black people who want to reclaim their connection to their African heritage.” Renato felt strongly about creating spaces to express the African identity of the people. Spaces to express not only their identity but sexuality. His design’s purpose isn’t just to be worn, but to inspire and educate the public about what it means to be Afro-Brazilian.  Some of his inspirations for the colors, fabrics and jewelry designs can be traced to Nigeria, Senegal, and Benin. As mentioned before, the Afro-Brazilian fashion trends are growing in popularity but unfortunately what is considered “trendy” or “in” is largely influenced by white designers who claim that Afro-Brazilian fashion is not a place for the politics of race but rather open for all to use. This is when it becomes important for the people to be conscious about who they are consuming from. Using culture for personal gain rather than spreading a  message of self-love and acceptance continues to be a problem, not only in Brazil but around the world. 

Renato Carneiro’s aim is to bring visibility to this African rooted culture and to reclaim African identities back into the hands of descendants themselves. “I wanted to create a place that affirmed the plurality of all our lives. A place that focused on the heritage of Afro-Brazilians, people in the diaspora and in Africa.” Renato has an unquestionably deep respect and commitment for his African roots.

Feathers and Fun!

by Yennifer Padilla

Every year millions of people from all over the world go to Brazil and experience a week-long celebration known as Carnaval. Looking to immerse themselves in the rich culture of music, dancing, lavish floats, and intricate costumes.

Over 70 samba schools participate and the top Rio de Janeiro samba schools compete in Carnaval, parading and looking forward to being recognized as the best. But what does it take to be the best? First, each school is responsible for choosing a theme, then the school creates the storyline, composes the music, creates the choreography, floats, and costumes. At the competition, schools are judged in 10 categories and each category is rated from 7-10. It is a PROCESS (elaborate holiday) that takes months of planning, hard work, and commitment. Two of the 10  categories include “Allegories and Props” and “Vanguard Commission.” In both these categories, the extravagant costumes and how well they fit into the storyline of the theme are an essential part.

The transformation of costumes overtime should be noted. Originally, only socialites would dress in luxurious costumes and masks that covered nearly every part of the body while commoners watched as a sign of wealth and status. Over time more and more people began to join in the celebration but with the heat in Brazil during the month of Carnaval, being completely clothed was not comfortable or practical. As people joined the festivities, the costumes became fun, colorful and creative making them more accessible and inexpensive. Eventually, things took a different turn and by the 1950’s women began wearing colorful bikinis. Today we see men and women covered in gems, feathers and body paint and of course, showing more skin.

With the growing popularity of Carnaval and the competition itself, samba schools have hundreds, even thousands of participants. The floats and costumes are given life by a Carnaval designer. The designer must consider all aspects and how they will fit together. Once the vision has been approved by the samba school, costume prototypes are sent to production lines and made in mass. Visitors and people within the community can join in the fun of dressing up and parading. Participants must buy costumes in advance and choose between the ground of float costume. Ground costume attire is unisex and people parade down the street. Each school can have between 6 to 7 floats. Selected members wear the most elaborate costumes, for example, the flag bearer and her escort not only wear richly designed costumes but are also one of the categories judged for the competition in terms of presentation, dance, interaction, and symbolic protection of the samba school banner.

Once the party is done what happens with all the costumes that are valued at hundreds even thousands of dollars? Few keep them as souvenirs but for those who will not be competing in the parade of champions, they shed their beautifully colored layers and toss them away… then looking forward,  wait and see what the following year brings with more feathers and fun.

Brazil Arts Connection Fundraiser

Brazil Arts Connection Samba Rock and World Groove featuring One Globe Radio.

Latin Grammy-nominated artist, Rogê represents the new generation of artists
of Brazilian Popular Music. Rogê is known for his samba based compositions and can easily transition to Bossa Nova and a diversity of Brazilian rhythms and styles. Samba Rock-based night!

One Globe Radio (“OGR”) is a project formed by incredible multi-instrumentalists with the goal of making music without borders, based on global music sounds, acid jazz, Middle Eastern, Electronica and authentic Brazilian music.

Marlon Fuentes, a former DJ for Shakira and deep vinyl collector brings to Del Monte heavy dance sets from Brazil and the world to keep you grooving all night!

Fundraiser for Brazil Arts Connection $10.00 at the door.

Del Monte Speakeasy, April 28 at 8:00 PM

52 Windward Ave, Venice, CA 90291

Brazilian Music Get Together Celebrating 40th Anniversary of Brazilian Hour Radio! Featuring Rique Pantoja, Marcos Ariel, Justo Almario

 

Music Performance featuring Rique Pantoja, Marcos Ariel, and Justo Almario.

Please join us for an exhibit showcasing photos, artifacts, memorabilia, and film in honor of the 40th Anniversary ofthe Brazilian Hour Radio.

Wednesday, July 18, 2018
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM PST

Also, enjoy a taste of Brazilian cuisine!

It’s with great enthusiasm that we present our upcoming Brazilian Music Get Together at the Consulate, featuring Rique Pantoja and Marcos Ariel on keyboard, and Justo Almario on reeds. A little background on why this will be a special evening. Lets start with Rique and Marcos. Two friends from Rio De Janeiro. Both had a very musical upbringing. Both became very accomplished professional musicians. However, they never performed together in concert – until now. Joining them is special guest Justo Almario. His multi-cultural life and experience becomes the bridge, the connection, that will create the musical alchemy that transcends borders.

The three will perform together for the first time in what will undoubtedly be a very memorable night of instrumental music.

As we celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Brazilian Hour Radio, Marcos Ariel was the first independent artist to send his record, a vinyl LP, to the program. “Bambu,” arrived in the mail from Brazil and received many plays on the program. Rique Pantoja played with Milton Nacimento, came to Los Angeles to perform at the Greek Theater. At the time I decided to release his album on a record label I started at the time. It was a great experience and the confirmation of a great friendship. Justo has performed on my programs countless times and its truly a privilege to have him with us.

– Sergio Mielniczenko

 

Vinicius de Moraes Gallery
8484 Wilshire Boulevard suite 300
Beverly Hills, CA 90211

Parking options:

Free public parking is available two blocks south of the Consulate at the Beverly Hills Public Parking Structure on 321 La Cienega Blvd. From there, walk two blocks north and the Consulate building is on the southeast corner of La Cienega and Wilshire.

Paid parking is also available in the Consulate’s building. We do not offer validation. Meter parking is also available nearby.

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Click here to RSVP

Rique Pantoja is a composer, arranger, producer, songwriter and jazz pianist. Growing up in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Rique Pantoja’s interest for music began with a family atmosphere that celebrated music. When he was 19, he moved to the United States to study at Berklee College of Music, and after three and a half years, he left for a professional opportunity. While in Boston, he was profoundly influenced by Charles Banacos, a renowned jazz pianist and teacher. He recalls how exciting it was to study music in a culture different from his own. After Berklee, his life as a professional musician took flight with a two-year period in Paris playing with important jazz musicians such as Chet Baker. Since then, he has performed on stage and in the recording studio with artists such as: Chet Baker, Carlos Santana, Brenda Russel, Lee Ritenour, Frank Gambale, Tommy Walker among many others.

His compositions encompass numerous styles, including pop, jazz and gospel. In 2008, “I Believed It,” a song he co-wrote with Zoë Theodorou, won the Covenant Award in Canada for “Jazz/Blues Song of the Year.”

Marcos Ariel is in the forefront of contemporary Brazilian music with a bi-national career bridging Rio and Los Angeles. His musical style is purely “Carioca” (one who is a native of Rio de Janeiro) splashed with a passion for Classical and Jazz. His enthusiasm as a pianist, flutist and composer is inspiring. As a musician, he is swift and precise transcending genuine warmth that can only be Marcos Ariel.

In his home of Rio de Janeiro, music flourished. His father encouraged him to listen and absorb the masters: Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and Chopin. He later developed an admiration for fellow countryman, Hermeto Pascoal and American contemporary Jazzman Chick Corea.

At a tender age of seven he began studying piano and by 1971 he was studying the flute in the School of Music of the Brazilian Symphonic Orchestra.

In 1986 Marcos released the album “Cenas Brasileiras” and was invited to perform at the FREE JAZZ FESTIVAL in São Paulo. Marcos Ariel opened up that evening for the world famous David Sanborn and Stanley Jordan.

In the next decade, Marcos began to develop his bi-coastal career (Rio de Janeiro/Los Angeles) releasing a series of albums that made his popularity even stronger in both Brazil and the U.S.

Marcos Ariel’s history and discography have always shown a forward thinking and desire to blend the eclectic approach to the numerous indigenous rhythms of his homeland with American Jazz.

Justo Almario is a multitalented master saxophonist , flutist, clarinetist, composer, arranger and clinician, with a long list of distinguished accomplishments. His style is a fusion of Jazz, South American genres, and other world rhythms which are a reflection of his own elegant style – signature sound of his former band, the legendary Weather Report. Justo’s mesmerizing sounds have been heard in Grammy-Award winning works such as Linda Ronstadt’s “Frenesi,” Placido Domingo’s “A Mi Alma Latina,” Luis Miguel’s “Romance,” Andrae Crouch’s “Mercy,” and Isreal Lopez Cachao’s “Master Sessions” & “Ahora Si;” as well as the Oscar-winning soundtracks from Happy Feet and Sideways.

Justo Almario’s playing has been featured on diverse projects, such as Queen Latifah’s “Living Outloud,” Jennifer Lopez’s hit HBO Special “Let’s Get Loud,” Andy Garcia’s “The Lost City,” and John Turturo’s “Romance and Cigarette” staring Susan Sarandon and James Gadolfini.

In 2002, while joining the ranks of Cedar Walton, Terrence Blanchard and Joe Lovano, Justo Almario became an integral part of the Newport Jazz Festival Tour, produced by George Wein. A native of Colombia, Mr. Almario went from child protégé to virtuoso. Justo Almario was primarily influenced by John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderly, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Bartok, Debussy and Bach. He studied at the prestigious Berklee College of Music before doing a stint with Mongo Santamaria as the band’s musical director. He has also taught at the Henry Mancini Institute and has mentored inner city youth during workshops at the World Stage. These days, he teaches saxophone in the Jazz Department at UCLA’s Music School.

A native of Colombia, Justo Almario went from child protégé to virtuoso. Although he is extremely appreciative, this modest wind wizard frequently deflects any accolades, opting instead to thank folks for merely showing up and sharing. This is paramount to a keenly sensitive artist who warmly connects with his diverse audience on many levels and will continue to heal and inspire. Justo Almario’s music serves as a bridge that links backgrounds, cultures, ages, and socioeconomic status. His music transcends the mundane and leaves his audience transfixed. A devoted family man, Justo’s spiritual path nurtures both his creative journey and his warm compassion as a human being.

BRAZILIAN HOUR RADIO SHOW

The Consulate General of Brazil in Los Angeles created the Brazilian Hour Radio Show in 1978 to promote Brazilian music and culture in the United States. Hosted, written, and produced by Sergio Mielniczenko, the program was introduced at the radio station KXLU-LA 88.9 FM on Marc 5th of that year. In 1981 the Brazilin Hour started a national distribution via satellite to all public stations in the United States. Also in 1981 the Brazilian Hour began its international distribution to Brazilian Diplomatic Missions and Centers of Brazilian Studies (CEBs). Currently, the Brazilian Hour is produced in Portuguese, Spanish, English, French and Mandarin. The show focuses on Brazilian popular music and presents frequently interviews with iconic Brazilian artists throughout the years, such as Gal Costa, Tom Jobim, Gilberto Gil, Caetano Veloso, Ivan Lins, Flora Purim, Oscar Castro Neves, Sergio Mendes, Egberto Gismonti, Seu Jorge, Céu, Marisa Monte, Jorge Benjor as well as breakthrough artists: Liz Rosa,Marcelo D2, Rogê, Vanessa da Matta, Artur Verocai, Roberta Sá, Paula Santoro, Mariana Aydar, Delia Fischer, Tulipa Ruiz etc. Some interviews can be viewed on the show’s youtube page ( www.youtube.com/user/BrazilianHour)

It is interesting to note that the opening theme of the Brazilian Hour titled Radio Samba was composed by Sergio Mielniczenko and arranged by Rique Pantoja with Rique on keyboards, Justo Almario on saxophone, Randy Tico on bass, Roberto Montero on guitar and Michael Shapiro on drums.

The Brazilian Hour radio show is broadcasted in 33 North American Cities. It can also be accessed online at www.brazilianhour.org

Brazilian Music Get Together Celebrating International Women’s Day

Music Performance “Cantoras”, featuring Katia Moraes, Carla Hassett and Sonia Santos
Exhibit Opening Reception “Divino Feminino”- The vital force of women portraited in the work of 20 contemporary artists.

Thu, March 8, 2018
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM PST

Also, enjoy a taste of Brazilian cuisine!

Enjoy this event hosted and produced by the Brazilian Consulate Cultural Department. Brazil Arts Connection is proud to support the Cultural Mission of The Brazilian Consulate in Los Angeles. We are an independent 501(c) nonprofit organization under the fiscal sponsorship of Community Partners. Your support helps us continue as a support organization to this amazing entity.

Vinicius de Moraes Gallery
8484 Wilshire Boulevard suite 300
Beverly Hills, CA 90211

Parking options:

Free public parking is available two blocks south of the Consulate at the Beverly Hills Public Parking Structure on 321 La Cienega Blvd. From there, walk two blocks north and the Consulate building is on the southeast corner of La Cienega and Wilshire.

Paid parking is also available in the Consulate’s building. We do not offer validation. Meter parking is also available nearby.

Click here to RSVP

4th. Annual Bloco Carnavalesco – Brazilian Carnival Parade

Join the parade!

Venice Brazilian Bloco Carnavalesco – Brazilian Carnaval Parade

Saturday February 10, 2018 at 12pm
Meeting at Rose Ave. and Ocean Frontboardwalk (at the public parking lot)
Parading southward on Ocean Front Walk ending at Windward Ave. (boardwalk)
Celebrating Carnaval Season in Brasil! Join us for our Carnaval Parade down the Boardwalk in Venice Beach.

Dance in the streets and enjoy classic Carnaval tunes! We encourage you to wear face paint / masks/costumes and beads – anything you can dream up. Be creative! Let’s make this a great Venice Party! Bringing the excitement from New Orleans, we’ll be celebrating with our friends from The Venice Beach Mardi Gras Parade as well. Families and kids are very much welcome! See you then!

Brazil Arts Connection is proud to support this event with the Brazilian Community at large.

– Sergio Mielniczenko

Brazilian Music Get Together | September 21

Revisiting Classic Brazilian Recordings | Os Afro Sambas by Baden Powell and Vinicius de Moraes

 

Join us for a live performance celebrating the 1966 recording of the album “Afro Sambas” by the guitarist Baden Powell and poet Vinicius de Moraes. This will be a rare opportunity to hear songs such as “Canto De Ossanha, Canto De Iemanjá, and Tempo de Amor, performed live in an intimate setting. This album played a role in bringing about aspects of afro Brazilian culture into Popular Brazilian Music. The two

musicians, brilliantly explored the Afro Brazilian religious music of Candomble, and as a result, made it accessible to the Brazilian mainstream.

 

 

Honoring the work of Adenor Gondim

Adenor started in the art of photography around the age of 20. Among his interests is the interrelationship between photography and people’s way of being, of recording what he sees, especially the cultural manifestations of the Bahian people. He did extensive work on the city of Cachoeira / BA, focusing mainly on the festive-religious manifestations linked to the”Irmandade da Boa Morte.” He participated in the exhibition Black memories, memories of blacks, realized by SESI-SP (Social Service of the Industry) and already exhibited in the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archeology, Oxford (England). It is part of the long-lived collection of the Afro Brasil Museum (São Paulo).

 

 

Photography Exhibit | Irmandade da Boa Morte

Also on that evening an exhibit by the renown photographer Adenor Gondim. This exhibit focusses on “Irmandade da Boa Morte” of the State of Bahia, Northern Brazil. Irmandade da Boa Morte was founded in 1821 has as its goal the preservation of Afro-Brazilian traditions

 

September 21st, 2017
Brazilian Music Get Together
Hosted by: The Brazilian Consulate Los Angeles, Cultural Affairs Sector
Location: 8484 Wilshire Blvd. 3rd floor, Suite 300, Beverly Hills, CA. 90211
Photo Exhibit opens at 6:30PM, Music performance begins at 7:00PM

CLICK TO RSVP

Upcoming Get Together: A Night of Brazilian Guitar

Brazilian Music Get Together:
A night of Master Brazilian Guitarists
6:30pm | August 16, 2017 | All Ages | Free with RSVP
Another first in our ongoing series of musical explorations, we bring together four amazing musicians performing as a group for the first time. Enjoy an evening of masterful performances covering traditional and modern guitar compositions featuring Fabiano do Nascimento, JP Mourão, Marcel Camargo, João Pedro Mourão and Capital.

VIDEO FROM THE EVENT! https://www.facebook.com/sergio.mielniczenko/videos/10155550108819705/

Art on Exhibit
Didu Lasso is a fine art painter, curator, and musician, born and raised in São Paulo, Brazil. His own work reflects his personality: simple, clear and direct, from Japanese traditional paintings with acrylic ink and sand, to pointillism and airbrush and clothing.

Art exhibit opening at 6:30 PM.

CLICK HERE TO RSVP

This Evening’s Honoree 
Our Honorees for this evening are Viver Brazil dance company artistic directors Linda Yudin and Luiz Badaró. Viver Brasil celebrating their 20th Anniversary honors Brazil’s African legacy through bold contemporary dance theater and increases awareness of the rich history of Afro-Brazilian dance and music.

Three pioneers of Brazilian Music

When we think of early Brazilian music, late 1800’s and early 1900’s, there is a style that readily comes to mind – choro. There are three outstanding choro composers of this era: Chiquinha Gonzaga, Ernesto Nazareth, and Pixinguinha.

Chiquinha Gonzaga (October 17, 1847, Rio de Janeiro – February 28, 1935 Rio de Janeiro) lived in many worlds with the fluidity to go from the elite of Rio de Janeiro, as well as the urban bars where you would find the “chorões” (choro players). She was the first woman conductor of Brazil and wrote the first major carnaval hit known as “Abre Alas.”

Ernesto Nazareth (March 20, 1863, Rio de Janeiro – February 4, 1934 Rio de Janeiro) had a classical music background and wrote choros as well as what he called “Tango Brasileiro,” a term he used to disguise the “street music and dance” which was in fact, maxixe – a sensual style that contrasted with his classical training. Interestingly enough, Ernesto used to perform his compositions in the foyer of the Odeon movie theater in Rio – for which he wrote the famous piece, “Odeon.”

ACC-foto01

Alfredo da Rocha Viana, Jr. (April 23, 1897 Rio de Janeiro – February 17, 1973, Ipanema, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), widely known as Pixinguinha, is one of the all time most respected Brazilian instrumentalists and composers. He got his nickname from his African grandmother who called him “Pizinguim” which means “good boy” in African dialect. He was able to decode Brazilian rhythms and phrasing so that sheet reading musicians could perform them. Therefore, establishing the basis for a truly instrumental style of Brazilian music. His composition “Carinhoso” became one of the top three most famous Brazilian songs at the turn of the century along with Aquarela do Brasil, and The Girl from Ipanema.

If you look into the progression of popular Brazilian music, we see lundu, maxixe, choro, and samba – all which have an important presence of afro-brazilian elements. Each of them with their social relevance. For example, maxixe was among the most popular styles around the world in the early 1900’s in Paris and even in Fred Astair films. We have an opportunity to experience this music on April 26th at 7pm. Click here to RSVP.

“Jazz is the American choro” – Hamilton de Holanda

Brazilian Music Get Together April 26, 7pm

Brazilian Music Get Together at The Consulate
Featuring Early Brazilian music with J.P Mourão (Guitar) and Luis Mascaro (Violin)

Wednesday, April 26pm – 7:00pm | Free with RSVP

Two members of the musical group, Farofa, J.P Mourão (Guitar) and Luis Mascaro (Violin), join forces to bring us early Brazilian music, rarely performed outside of Brazil. Enjoy an evening of early music from Mondinhas, Lundu, Maxixe, and Choro with compositions by Ernesto Nazareth, Chiquinha Gonzaga and Pixinguinha. The basis of instrumental Brazilian music. This evening will be an opportunity for learning and conversation about this period and styles of Brazilian music. Sergio Mielniczenko will lead the discussion and share stories and anecdotes on the subject.

Hosted by: The Brazilian Consulate Los Angeles, Cultural Affairs Sector
Location: 8484 Wilshire Blvd. 3rd floor, Suite 300, Beverly Hills, CA. 90211

RSVP BELOW

3rd. Annual Bloco Carnavalesco in Venice

3rd Annual Bloco Carnavalesco – Brazilian Carnaval Parade
Saturday February 25, 2017 at 12pm
Meeting at Rose Ave. and Ocean Front boardwalk (at the public parking lot)
Venice, CA


Celebrating Carnaval Season in Brasil!
Celebrating Carnaval Season in Brasil! Join us for our Carnaval Parade down the Boardwalk in Venice Beach. Dance to choreography by Linda Yudin / Luiz Badaró of Viver Brasil, and Vida Vierra with Swing Brazil Tribe. Enjoy classic Carnaval tunes with Katia Moraes who will be joined with a rousing Batucada made of some of LA ‘s great Bateria, “Samba Da Mudança” led by Ali, Lexa, Samba Soul Dancers from Global Dance Arts. Also joining us will be the Fabio Santana De Souza Brass Band, Capoeira Batuque, and more! We encourage you to wear face paint / masks/costumes and beads. Let’s make this a great Venice Party! Families and kids are very much welcome! See you then. Forró After Party with “Forró in LA”!

Forró Afterparty with ‘Forró in LA’ at The Townhouse
57 Windward Ave. Venice CA
3pm

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